FAQ: How Can We Protect The Blue Mountains?

Is Blue Mountains protected?

The property is comprised of eight protected areas in two blocks separated by a transportation and urban development corridor. These protected areas are the Blue Mountains, Wollemi, Yengo, Nattai, Kanangra-Boyd, Gardens of Stone and Thirlmere Lakes National Parks, and the Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve.

Who takes care of the Blue Mountains?

In the Blue Mountains there are two services who do this – Aged Care Assessment Service and NSW Health Regional Assessment Service Nepean/Central West.

What are they doing to protect the three sisters?

The Legend As the lives of the three sisters were seriously in danger, a witchdoctor from the Katoomba tribe took it upon himself to turn the three sisters into stone to protect them from any harm. While he had intended to reverse the spell when the battle was over, the witchdoctor himself was killed.

What is important about the Blue Mountains?

The most globally important value of the Greater Blue Mountains is the area’s representation of ecosystems dominated by eucalypts. The region’s diverse ecosystems demonstrate the continuing natural processes that have changed Australia’s vegetation over millions of years.

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Can we visit Blue Mountains today?

The Blue Mountains Heritage Centre is closed to visitors due to the COVID restrictions. Due to the developing COVID-19 situation in NSW, please consult the latest NSW Government news and updates about COVID-19 for advice on required safety measures before visiting a park.

What lives in Blue Mountains?

The Wildlife of the Blue Mountains

  • Tiger Quoll. When you’re travelling through, keep your eyes peeled for species such as the tiger quoll.
  • Yellow-Bellied Glider. These cute little fluffy animals are well worth the spotting.
  • Green and Golden Bell Frog.
  • Blue Mountain Water Skink.
  • Dingo.
  • Koalas.
  • Kangaroos.
  • Bats.

Do you have to pay for Blue Mountains?

There are no designated entry points to the Blue Mountains National Park, which is managed by the National Parks and Wildlife Service, for the simple reason there are hundreds of roads accessing the park. There are thus no fees. The Blue Mountains City Council does however charge parking fees.

Do you have to pay to go to the Blue Mountains?

This Blue Mountains tours attraction is free. But you may have to pay the parking fees though. And if you want to buy some souvenirs in the town of Blackheath, you must open up your purse for some cash.

Why are the 3 sisters famous?

The Three Sisters play an important part in Aboriginal history and, according to legend, were once three beautiful sisters called Meehni, Wimlah, and Gunnedoo. Leaving the three sisters to remain as the large rock formations for all eternity. Standing mournfully high above the Jamison Valley, never to be human again.

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What makes the Three Sisters special?

Many natural landforms in the Blue Mountains have special significance to Aboriginal people. The Three Sisters rock formation is sacred to the Gundungurra people who tell the story of how the sisters were turned to stone by their father, a Witch Doctor, to protect them from a dangerous and much-feared Bunyip.

Who owns Blue Mountains?

Once considered an impassable barrier, the Blue Mountains is now a major gateway to Western New South Wales. We acknowledge the Aboriginal Dharug, Gundungurra, Wanaruah, Wiradjuri, Darkinjung and Tharawal Nations as the traditional owners of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area.

Why are they called Blue Mountains?

In 1788 the Blue Mountains were originally named “Carmarthen Hills” and “Landsdowne Hills” by Governor Phillip, however, it wasn’t long after, that the distinctive blue haze surrounding the area saw the change in name to the Blue Mountains. The Blue Mountains is densely populated by oil bearing Eucalyptus trees.

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